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Posts tagged ‘communication’

Round 1 of the On Think Tanks Data Visualisation Competition 2014 is now Open!

The wait is over! The On Think Tanks Data Visualisation Competition is back in a newer -- and better -- incarnation for the 2014-15 season. The competition is now open to think tanks all over the world. The new and improved competition site has more information, more resources and will provide greater opportunities to learn about data visualisation.

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Selecting different ways to reach audiences: a strategically ongoing effort

In this third post in the series on audience segmentation and development Vanesa Weyrauch offers some practical advice on which communication tools may work best for some of the main think tank audiences.

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The challenge of communicating with different actors: is segmentation a good investment for think tanks?

Vanesa Weyrauch writes about segmenting audiences: if think tanks audiences are different should think tanks not have different communication approaches for each one of them? She reports on a study conducted with ASIES, in Guatemala, and provides some conceptual and practical advice.

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What do policymakers want?

What do policymakers want? Three studies, one from the White House, one from Whitehall, and one from Australia, provide excellent information and insights into what they need from researchers and how they prefer to get it. You may not be surprised to find that they like theory and distrust anyone who talks more jargon than them.

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Vine in 60 seconds: An introduction of Twitter’s video app for think tanks

Today I'm giving a short presentation at IDS on Vine -- a short video sharing service for Twitter -- to our Digital Communications Peer Group. And while I hope it's useful to others working here, I thought it might also be of interest to others working in other think tanks too. I figured that the only way to present on vines was to actually create some -- so below you can find my presentation: Vine in 60 seconds.

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Playing to the Gallery (and the uses of typologies)

Some think tanks, like artists, prefer to be recognised only by their peers. They do not care much for recognition beyond their own industries and even look down on colleagues that do. This slightly light-hearted typology of think tanks may help them think about their place in their societies.

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EVENT: Wonkcomms teams and skill sets: what does the future hold?

The last three WonkComms events have considered the ‘why’, ‘what’, ‘how’ and ‘where’ of think tank communications. This event turns attention to ‘who’ – the human resources think tanks can call on for their communications, what skills are needed to progress in the sector and how to develop them.

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Data visualisation: A pen and cantaloupe may be enough

The other week I had the good fortune of participating in an excellent meeting in Prague hosted by the Open Society Foundations: Policy Research, Technology and Advocacy Event @ the Hub. The event was designed to bring experts together from across Central and Eastern European think tanks to share ideas and learn from each other on innovative approaches to evidence-based advocacy and communications.

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Taking think tank communications to the next level: Determining what goes where (Part 2)

The previous post suggested that this can be achieved by working through three steps: a) what should get done, b) who is best placed to do it, and c) empowering those who are best placed to do it to do it.
To answer the first question, the post examined what an informed content strategy looked like. And before we dive into step b, let’s consider first why we even need a content strategy.

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Taking think tank communications to the next level: Determining what goes where (Part 1)

Various parts of a think tank or research organisation must specialise in specific functions and skills – a Durkheimian ‘organic society’ writ small. For such a society, Durkheim observed that they were more likely to have laws and regulations that facilitated cooperation rather than those that punished individuals. Kicking communications activities up a gear within an organisation requires a similar approach: rules (however formal or informal) that facilitate cooperation around its constituent parts. Within the communications remit, that’s about figuring out what goes where. In other words, it’s about determining: a) what should get done, b) who is best placed to do it, and c) empowering those who are best placed to do it to, well, actually do it!

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