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Posts tagged ‘Latin America’

A quick and dirty Transparify-like analysis of Latin American think tanks

This post presents another Quick and Dirty Transparify rating of a group of Latin American think tanks. It is intended as a kick starter for a greater conversation on Transparency and, hopefully, a DIY trend.

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Transparency for think tanks: the latest fashion or an urgent reform?

This post was written by Orazio Bellettini, Executive Director of Grupo FARO in Ecuador. It presents ideas and reflections generated on the panel “From Research to Impact, from Transparency to Independence” included in the Latin American Think Tanks Summit organized by the Getulio Vargas Foundation. Orazio considers some of the arguments for and against greater transparency.

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Think tanks and electoral processes: an opportunity that should not be missed

About 4 years ago, Fernando Straface from CIPPEC called for Latin American think tanks to share what he called a new technology of influence in electoral years. After close to a decade of projects in more than 5 countries in the region, it is now possible to share this innovation with others. This series has presented some of the lessons learned by think tanks in Peru, Ecuador, Colombia, Argentina and Paraguay. In this post, Enrique Mendizabal argues for its replicability in other regions and provides some advice on how to go about it.

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Lessons on the role of Latin American think tanks in electoral processes – the way forward

In this post, Leandro Echt outlines a number of key lessons from cases of Latin American think tanks working to inform and improve the electoral processes in their countries. He also provides a set of recommendations for action to help share the lessons learned in Latin America with other regions.

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Paraguay debate: The challenge of nourishing the political debate in times of elections

In this post, Marcelo Mancuello, from CADEP in Paraguay, describes a initiative to influence the Paraguayan elections that was developed with the support of CIES, in Peru. Marcelo emphasises the importance of working in a network to achieve the initiative's objectives.

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Fernando Straface: “The challenge is refining the think tanks’ technology for influence in electoral campaigns”

In this interview, Fernando Straface, Executive Director of CIPPEC, describes the organisation's experiences of 2011 and 2014. He also outlines the main characteristics of what he calls a new Latin American technology of influence and calls for a collaborative effort to develop it further and share it with think tanks in other parts of the world.

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Experience of Fedesarrollo in presidential campaigns in Colombia

In this post, Leonardo Villar, Executive Director of the Foundation for High Education and Development (Fedesarrollo), reflects on the think tank's recent efforts to influence the Colombian electoral process and debate. The post argues that think tanks need to think very carefully about the political nuances of the campaign in order to design an effective strategy.

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Orazio Bellettini: “Think tanks can create spaces for dialogue among relevant actors of the policy community”

In this interview, Orazio Bellettini, Director of Grupo Faro reflects on the initiative that the think tank carried out in 2006 to influence the electoral debate in Ecuador. He argues that is necessary to work at both the national and sub-national levels.

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Focusing the electoral debate: CIES’ experience during the Peru 2011 campaign

In this second post of the series of Think Tanks and Elections Javier Portocarrero reflects on the lessons learned from CIES' most recent effort to influence the electoral debate win Peru. CIES' 2006 project has served as a guide for think tanks across Latin America. The lessons presented in this post are useful for think tanks and donors interested in adopting this new Latin American Technology.

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Think tanks and the electoral process: lessons from Latin America

Many think tanks argue that elections are the worst time to attempt to influence policy. Think tanks in Latin America, disagree. There, they have developed a new technology of influence that is able to influence both policy and the policy context. This post introduces a series edited by Leandro Echt that collects cases from Peru, Ecuador, Colombia, Argentina and Paraguay.

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